Psychological Skills for the Police Professional

Psychological Skills for the Police Professional.

a brief description of two psychological skills that would be challenging for you to teach police professionals. Analyze why each skill would be a challenge, and explain how you would address each challenge. Support your analysis with references to the Learning Resources.

Learning Resources

Readings Course Text: Psychology and Policing Chapter 1, “Person Perception and Interpersonal Skills” Chapter 2, “Attribution, Prejudice and Stereotyping”

Article: Fox, R. (2007). Stress management…and the stress-proof vest. Law & Order, 55(2), 352–355. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Article: Greene, C. H., III, & Banks, L. M. (2009). Ethical guideline evolution in psychological support to interrogation operations. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 61(1), 25–32. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Article: Halpern, A. L., Halpern, J. H., & Doherty, S. B. (2008). “Enhanced” interrogation of detainees: Do psychologists and psychiatrists participate? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine, 3, 1–11. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Article: Kinnaird, B. A. (2007). Exploring liability profiles: A proximate cause analysis of police misconduct: Part 1. International Journal of Police Science & Management, 9(2), 135–144. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Article: Leggett, J., Goodman, W., & Dinani, S. (2007). People with learning disabilities’ experiences of being interviewed by the police. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(3), 168–173. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Article: Olson, B., Soldz, S., & Davis, M. (2008). The ethics of interrogation and the American Psychological Association: A critique of policy and process. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine, 3, 1–15. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Article: Phillips, S. W., & Varano, S. P. (2008). Police criminal charging decisions: An examination of post-arrest decision-making. Journal of Criminal Justice, 36(4), 307–315. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Article: Saakvitne, K., et. al. (n.d.). Occupational vulnerability for psychologists. Retrieved from http://www.apapracticecentral.org/ce/self-care/vulnerability.aspx

Article: Schafer, J. R. (2002). Making ethical decisions: A practical model. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 71(5), 14–18. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Article: Weiss, J., & Dresser, M. (2001). Special report II: Women in law enforcement: A new look for SWAT. Law & Order, 49(7), 86–89. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Article: Woods, M. J. (2000). Interpersonal communication for police officers: Using needs assessment to prepare for skeptical trainees. Business Communication Quarterly, 63(4), 40–48. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Article: Young, A. T., Fuller, J., & Riley, B. (2008). On-scene mental health counseling provided through police departments. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 30(4), 345-361. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Government Document: Alpert, G. P., Dunham, R. G., Stroshine, M., Bennett, K., & MacDonald, J. (2004). Police officers’ decision making and discretion: Forming suspicion and making a stop. (NCJ Publication No. 213004). Retrieved from http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/213004.pdf
(Please read the “Executive Summary,” pp. 1–17.)

Psychological Skills for the Police Professional

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